How to Mix Wood Types and Finishes

Beth Rice 13/09/2017

Gone are the days when all the solid wood furniture in a room had to match each other and the floor. Mixing wood types and finishes livens up a room and adds interest.

Whether you’ve inherited some beautiful solid wood furniture or you’re building your home furniture collection piece by piece, here are some tips on how to mix wood furniture.

Identify the Undertones

While the finish of each piece in a room doesn’t need to match, the undertones of the wood should complement each other.

Warm undertones have a yellow, orange, or red sheen.

The Mansfield Contemporary Dining Chair has warm undertones.

Amish Mansfield Chair

Cool undertones have a grayish cast.

The Milan Dining Chair by Keystone has cool undertones.

Amish Milan Shaker Dining Chair

Neutral undertones are versatile. Beige in color, they can be mixed with warm, cool, or other neutral undertones.

The Amish Mansion Dining Chair has neutral undertones.

Amish Mansion Side Chair

Keep it Simple

Again, while furniture finishes don’t need to match, try not to incorporate more than two to three in a room. Following this tip will make it easier to mix finished furniture. Just be sure to distribute finished pieces evenly. Too many dark or light finishes on one side of a room could make it look unbalanced.

The gray-toned finish on the base and dark wood top give the Lexington Hardwood Kitchen Island a beautifully balanced look.

Lexington Hardwood Kitchen Island

Grain Advice

Wood grain refers to the pattern found in the wood. In general, woods with large grains create a more casual look while woods with fine grains are considered more formal. It is OK to mix grains, but try to keep them as similar as possible if you are trying to create a certain “mood” in a room.

The Amish Sunrise Raised Panel Storage Bench displays the prominent grain of oak for a more casual look.

Amish Sunrise Raised Panel Storage Bench

Cherry wood, like shown on the Amish Louis Philippe Euro Sleigh Bed, has a fine straight grain, contributing to a formal look.

Amish Louis Philippe Euro Sleigh Bed

Feel free to mix grain patterns like the pronounced pattern found on the oak Amish Rossi Pub Table paired with the fine grained brown maple of the Amish Hawthorn Bar Stool.

 

Amish Rossi Pub Table

Amish Rossi Pub Table

Amish Hawthorn Bar Stool

Amish Hawthorn Bar Stool

The Beauty of a Buffer

Buffers like a neutral colored rug can create a smooth transition between a wood floor and a contrasting table or chairs. It can also soften the look and add warmth, texture, and color between the two woods.

A chevron-patterned rug pulls together the contrasting finishes of the Mission Kitchen Island, Eddison Bar Stools, and Wilford Saddle Bar Stools in the Rustic Ancient Mission Island Set, part of our popular Shop the Look section.

Rustic Ancient Mission Island Set

Rustic Ancient Mission Island Set

Rustic Ancient Mission Set

Amish Eddison Stationary Bar Stool | Large Amish Mission Kitchen Island | Amish Wilford Saddle Bar Stool

Creating Contrast while Keeping it Simple

Creating contrast is sure to draw attention. But, if you’re not sure where to start, remember the following:

  • Furniture and flooring create an attractive contrast. Pair light colored furniture with a dark floor and vice versa for an easy contrasting look.
  • Select one dark wood furniture item as a focal point among lighter wood pieces or make an anchor piece stand out by surrounding it with contrasting wood or colors.

It’s been said that variety is the spice of life. Spice up your home with custom furniture available in a wide variety of wood types and finishes.

Beth Riceby Beth Rice (62 Posts)

Beth Rice moved into the work she dreamed of when she began as a content writer for DutchCrafters in 2015. With an A.A. Degree from Manatee Community College, she went on to study Journalism at the University of South Florida for one year. Two daughters and 23 years of marriage to her wonderful husband John became her path with aspirations to write always in her sights. Conveying the qualities, functions and benefits of DutchCrafters fine furniture keeps her creative as she contributes to content throughout the website. Her published work includes one children’s book, I’m Adopted, I’m Special. An avid reader and devoted runner, Beth hopes to publish a novel in the future. DutchCrafters Timber to Table blog was started in 2012 to provide our customers and other readers with woodworkers stories, Amish culture information, and furniture selection or interior design tips.


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